Tag Archives: child support

Four Scenarios Using Illinois' New Child Support LawIn July, Illinois enacted a long-anticipated overhaul of its child support payment law. Whereas the previous system always placed the financial burden on the party with less parenting time, the income shares model more equitably splits the parenting cost between the parties. The court combines the parents’ net monthly incomes and calculates the percentage of the combined incomes that each parent’s individual income accounts for. The court consults a chart that quantifies the expected monthly child-related expenses, based on the number of children and combined incomes. Each parent is responsible for paying for a percentage of the child-related expenses that equals the percentage that his or her income makes up of the combined incomes.

In most cases, the parent who is allocated a majority of the parenting time will still receive child support payments from the other parent. However, the amount will vary more than it did under the previous system, depending on:

  • If the recipient parent has a greater income than the paying parent; and
  • If the parenting time is split so that each parent has the children for at least 40 percent of the time during a year, which is called Shared Physical Care.

To help explain the new income shares model, here are four child support scenarios. In each scenario, the parents have two children and a combined net monthly income of $5,000:

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Spouse May Be Hiding Income in Own BusinessOne challenge in negotiating a financial settlement in a divorce can be trying to figure out your spouse’s true worth, as compared to what he or she claims. Understating your income and assets gives you an unfair advantage when determining the division of marital property, child support payments and spousal maintenance. In particular, people who are self-employed or own a business are capable of artificially deflating their personal worth. Spouses may think they are savvy when they find ways to understate the value of their businesses or themselves. However, the other spouse would see it as dishonest and manipulative. You must be aware of the ways people can take advantage of their self-employment during a divorce.

Manipulating Finances

When people are self-employed or run a business, their personal and professional assets and expenses often mix. As their own boss, they have the ability to:

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Controlling Your Finances After DivorceGetting a divorce can lift the emotional burden of being in a stressful marriage. However, single life has its own stresses, not the least of which is the financial adjustment. Your household income may be decreased, or you may be responsible for monthly support payments to your former spouse. Expenses you once shared with your spouse are now your individual responsibility. It can be a harsh adjustment if your former spouse was in charge of keeping track of your finances. You can take steps during and after your divorce to help yourself deal with your new financial independence.

Divorce Settlement

When negotiating the terms of your divorce, support payments and the division of property can give you some financial security. Child and spousal support, in particular, can benefit you for years:

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Kane County child support lawyersWhile very few people would dispute the appropriateness or the need for child support, there are differing opinions regarding how support payments should be determined. For many years, Illinois law based child support calculations primarily on the income of the supporting parent and the number of children needing support. Beginning next summer, however, the state’s approach will be changing to one that is seen by many as more equitable since it accounts for both parents’ income and the actual cost of raising a child.

Income Shares Child Support Model

Last summer, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner signed a measure several years in the making. The new law provides a totally updated model for determining a parent’s child support obligation. The method is known as “income shares” and is currently in use in more than three dozen other states. According to the income shares model, the combined income of both parents is used to determine a “basic support amount,” or the amount that the couple would spend on raising their child if they had remained in the same household. The Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services has been tasked with developing a table for determining this amount as a percentage of the parents’ combined income.

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Kane County family law attorneysIn almost every aspect of a divorce proceeding, you and your spouse have the freedom to reach an agreement on your own, without interference from the court. There are certain elements, such as the allocation of parental responsibilities and child support, that the court will review before the agreement is entered as part of the judgment, but the court will only make changes if necessary. Once an agreement has been approved and entered by the court, you cannot change your mind about the agreed upon terms. As a Knox County woman recently discovered, it is vitally important to be certain that your agreement meets your needs before it is signed and presented to the court.

In re Marriage of Eastburg

The Third District Court Appellate Court in Illinois released its ruling last week on a case involving a child support agreement between divorcing parents. Shortly after their divorce in December 2006, the couple in question originally agreed that the father would pay $511 bimonthly in child support, allegedly equal to 28 percent of his net income. As time went on, the mother would petition for an increase in payment to correlate to the father’s increase in income. Most recently, in May 2015, the couple agreed that, based on the father’s 2014 income, he should pay $721 bimonthly.

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Goostree Law Group

Goostree Law Group

 555 S. Randall Road, Suite 200
St. Charles, IL 60174

 630-584-4800

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Wheaton, IL 60187

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Our Illinois divorce attorneys represent clients in Kane County, DuPage County, Kendall County and DeKalb County, including Geneva, Batavia, St.Charles, Wayne, Wasco, Elburn, Virgil, Lily Lake, Aurora, North Aurora, Elgin, South Elgin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Gilberts, Millcreek, Maple Park, Kaneville, LaFox, Yorkville, Oswego, Plano, Sugar Grove, Big Rock, Bristol, Newark, DeKalb, Sycamore, Naperville, Wheaton, West Chicago, Winfield, Warrenville, Downers Grove, Lombard, Oak Brook, Streamwood, Hoffman Estates, Barrington, South Barrington, Lake Barrington, Schaumburg, Big Grove, Boulder Hill, Bristol, Joliet, Kendall, Lisbon, Minooka, Montgomery, Plainfield, Sandwich, Yorkville and many other cities.

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