Tag Archives: visitation

Illinois child custody attorney, Illinois family law attorneyWhen the court determines appropriate parenting time and parenting responsibility arrangements for divorcing couples, it considers multiple factors. These factors are outlined in the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act. Examples of these factors include the child's personal needs, each parent's income and assets, the other individuals present in each parent's household, and the quality of the child's relationship with each parent.

As you can see, one of these factors is not like the others. The court can quantify each parent's annual income and expenses and determine the child's personal needs in concrete terms, but qualifying the child's relationship with each of his or her parents is much more difficult. What makes a quality relationship? How can the court find one relationship to be stronger than another, when every relationship that exists is unique?

Attachment and Bonding

Continue reading

child-custodyAs our society progresses, our laws need to change to reflect these changes. Decades ago, Illinois' divorce and child custody laws included a provision known as the tender years doctrine, which awarded custody of young children primarily to their mothers on the basis that a mother could care for a young child better than a father could. This was done away with as gender roles changed and the court recognized that fathers can be as capable of caring for their children as mothers. Similar changes are coming to the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act come January 1st, 2016 through Senate Bill 57.

These changes include many new developments to Illinois' child custody laws. In fact, one of these changes is the deletion of the term “custody.” To learn more about the changes that are coming and what they could mean for you and your family law case, contact an experienced Illinois family attorney for guidance.

New Terms Replace Old Terms

Continue reading

custody-modificationWhen the court determines an appropriate custody arrangement for your child, it does so with your child's best interest in mind. However, your child's best interests do not necessarily remain static over the years. In fact, as he or she matures, it is most likely that the right custody arrangement will change along with your child. If this is the case, consider modifying your child's custody arrangement. Seeking a modification of the custody schedule does not mean that you or your former spouse is a bad parent or a better parent than the other. It means that your child's needs have changed and you are working together to create a custody arrangement that best meets those needs.

If you feel a modified child custody arrangement is in your child's best interest, the first person to speak to about a potential change is your former spouse. After all, this modification will involve him or her and his or her relationship with your child. The next party to speak with is your attorney to discuss the legal process of altering a child custody arrangement. Do not be casual about changing your arrangement – even if you and your partner agree to a modified schedule and can follow it now without a problem, following a custody schedule that deviates from your court order is technically contempt of court. Do not put yourself in this position by failing to take the correct steps to alter your child custody arrangement.

Issues to Consider

Continue reading

b2ap3_thumbnail_child-and-domestic-violence.jpgIf your child is not currently in your care, call 911 and report the abuse allegation to police right away. If your child is currently in your care, bring him or her to the hospital for an examination by a doctor. A doctor can note the signs of physical or sexual abuse. Determining if emotional or psychological abuse has occurred can be more difficult, but this type of abuse is as damaging to a child as physical or sexual harm.

Keeping your child beyond your allotted parenting time with him or her because you suspect he or she is being abused in your former partner's home is one of the only ways you can legally violate your custody or visitation schedule. If you need to do this, contact your attorney to record the date, time, and reason why you did not allow your former partner to spend time with your child. If your former partner takes legal action against you, you will need this record to prove that you did not violate your child custody agreement without a valid reason.

Never, under any circumstance, make a false report of child abuse in an attempt to slander your former partner. This can only complicate your child custody order and ultimately, reflect negatively on you and your parenting ability. Child abuse is a serious allegation – regardless of your relationship with your former spouse and feelings about him or her, it is never acceptable to falsely accuse an individual of abuse if you know that abuse has not occurred.

Continue reading

b2ap3_thumbnail_coparenting-and-back-to-school.jpgSummer is in its final stages and for students and their parents across Illinois, it is time to start thinking about the upcoming academic year. For some families, this is a return to the same old routine. For others, this year marks the beginning of a new stage in the student's school career such as kindergarten, high school, or college.

For students of divorced parents, adjusting to a new school year can have additional concerns. Going back to school means a new schedule and new responsibilities for you and your former partner. Prepare for these new responsibilities with your former spouse by discussing it with him or her before the end of the summer. Set some ground rules and expectations for your child during the school year and be consistent with them. Co-parenting your child is a team effort. Take the following tips into consideration as you prepare for your child to go back to school this fall.

Get Involved with Your Child's Schooling

Continue reading
Goostree Law Group

Goostree Law Group

 555 S. Randall Road, Suite 200
St. Charles, IL 60174

 630-584-4800

 400 S. County Farm Road, Suite 300
Wheaton, IL 60187

 630-407-1777

Our Illinois divorce attorneys represent clients in Kane County, DuPage County, Kendall County and DeKalb County, including Geneva, Batavia, St.Charles, Wayne, Wasco, Elburn, Virgil, Lily Lake, Aurora, North Aurora, Elgin, South Elgin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Gilberts, Millcreek, Maple Park, Kaneville, LaFox, Yorkville, Oswego, Plano, Sugar Grove, Big Rock, Bristol, Newark, DeKalb, Sycamore, Naperville, Wheaton, West Chicago, Winfield, Warrenville, Downers Grove, Lombard, Oak Brook, Streamwood, Hoffman Estates, Barrington, South Barrington, Lake Barrington, Schaumburg, Big Grove, Boulder Hill, Bristol, Joliet, Kendall, Lisbon, Minooka, Montgomery, Plainfield, Sandwich, Yorkville and many other cities.

ovc
Contact Us
Chat Us Text Us