Tag Archives: child support

Taking a Qualitative Approach to Divorce ParentingFiguring out child-related issues during a divorce often requires crunching the numbers. Parents must determine:

  • How many hours the children will spend with each parent during the week;
  • How to divide holidays and special occasions with the children;
  • What their total child-related expenses are; and
  • What percentage of child support each parent is responsible for.

Divorcing parents often come up with the best solutions to these issues by considering the emotional aspects of parenting. Being a good parent takes more than spending time and money. The quality of the parental relationship is just as important towards a child’s emotional development.

Parenting Time

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Parental Rights with Unmarried Same Sex CouplesThough same sex couples are able to legally marry, not all couples take advantage of that right. Some couples committed to each other long before the change in the laws and do not see marriage as a necessity. Thus, the legal process of them splitting up is different from a divorce:

  • On the positive side, they have the flexibility to determine their own separation agreement without worrying about complying with divorce laws; but
  • On the negative side, they do not have the same protections that assure that their shared properties will be divided equitably.

However, unmarried same sex couples do not have flexibility when it comes to child-related issues. Child support and the allocation of parental responsibilities must comply with state laws, regardless of whether the parents are married.

Shared Parentage

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Four Scenarios Using Illinois' New Child Support LawIn July, Illinois enacted a long-anticipated overhaul of its child support payment law. Whereas the previous system always placed the financial burden on the party with less parenting time, the income shares model more equitably splits the parenting cost between the parties. The court combines the parents’ net monthly incomes and calculates the percentage of the combined incomes that each parent’s individual income accounts for. The court consults a chart that quantifies the expected monthly child-related expenses, based on the number of children and combined incomes. Each parent is responsible for paying for a percentage of the child-related expenses that equals the percentage that his or her income makes up of the combined incomes.

In most cases, the parent who is allocated a majority of the parenting time will still receive child support payments from the other parent. However, the amount will vary more than it did under the previous system, depending on:

  • If the recipient parent has a greater income than the paying parent; and
  • If the parenting time is split so that each parent has the children for at least 40 percent of the time during a year, which is called Shared Physical Care.

To help explain the new income shares model, here are four child support scenarios. In each scenario, the parents have two children and a combined net monthly income of $5,000:

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Spouse May Be Hiding Income in Own BusinessOne challenge in negotiating a financial settlement in a divorce can be trying to figure out your spouse’s true worth, as compared to what he or she claims. Understating your income and assets gives you an unfair advantage when determining the division of marital property, child support payments and spousal maintenance. In particular, people who are self-employed or own a business are capable of artificially deflating their personal worth. Spouses may think they are savvy when they find ways to understate the value of their businesses or themselves. However, the other spouse would see it as dishonest and manipulative. You must be aware of the ways people can take advantage of their self-employment during a divorce.

Manipulating Finances

When people are self-employed or run a business, their personal and professional assets and expenses often mix. As their own boss, they have the ability to:

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Controlling Your Finances After DivorceGetting a divorce can lift the emotional burden of being in a stressful marriage. However, single life has its own stresses, not the least of which is the financial adjustment. Your household income may be decreased, or you may be responsible for monthly support payments to your former spouse. Expenses you once shared with your spouse are now your individual responsibility. It can be a harsh adjustment if your former spouse was in charge of keeping track of your finances. You can take steps during and after your divorce to help yourself deal with your new financial independence.

Divorce Settlement

When negotiating the terms of your divorce, support payments and the division of property can give you some financial security. Child and spousal support, in particular, can benefit you for years:

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Goostree Law Group

Goostree Law Group

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St. Charles, IL 60174


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Wheaton, IL 60187


Our Illinois divorce attorneys represent clients in Kane County, DuPage County, Kendall County and DeKalb County, including Geneva, Batavia, St.Charles, Wayne, Wasco, Elburn, Virgil, Lily Lake, Aurora, North Aurora, Elgin, South Elgin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Gilberts, Millcreek, Maple Park, Kaneville, LaFox, Yorkville, Oswego, Plano, Sugar Grove, Big Rock, Bristol, Newark, DeKalb, Sycamore, Naperville, Wheaton, West Chicago, Winfield, Warrenville, Downers Grove, Lombard, Oak Brook, Streamwood, Hoffman Estates, Barrington, South Barrington, Lake Barrington, Schaumburg, Big Grove, Boulder Hill, Bristol, Joliet, Kendall, Lisbon, Minooka, Montgomery, Plainfield, Sandwich, Yorkville and many other cities.

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