Tag Archives: Kane County divorce attorney

Surviving Divorce as a TeacherTeachers have a lower divorce rate as compared to other professions, but those who do get divorced face unique challenges. As a teacher, your primary concern is usually for your students. Your caregiving nature likely extends to your home life, as a spouse and parent. During your divorce, you may be focusing on your own needs more than you are accustomed to doing. It is important to take care of yourself during your divorce and plan how you will balance your teaching career with your personal needs.

Taking Time Off

Most divorcees use occasional personal days in order to attend meetings or court hearings. Teachers must also be aware of their emotional state and how it may affect their students:

  • You must be able to make it through the school day without emotionally breaking down in front of your students; and
  • Being distracted by your divorce may make you less attentive as a teacher.

Now is the time to use your sick and personal days if you have accumulated them over several years. If you do not have many days available, ask your human resource department about your options if you need additional time off. Your students need a teacher who is able to be fully engaged in their education.

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Law Prohibits Electronic Eavesdropping on SpouseIt should be obvious that you are not allowed to break into your spouse’s locked filing cabinet in order to obtain his or her personal documents during your divorce. The same concept applies to digital information. You are not allowed to snoop through your spouse's computer or other electronic devices to find private communications and documents. The evidence you find would be inadmissible in your divorce case, and you could face criminal charges for violating eavesdropping laws. However, you can use digital information that your spouse makes available to the public.

Electronic Eavesdropping

Eavesdropping is the act of obtaining information that a person can reasonably expect to remain private. There are several methods someone could use to eavesdrop on his or her spouse’s electronic communications or access digital documents:

  1. Unauthorized Log-In: Many computers and email accounts require a user name and password in order to access them. You may know or be able to guess your spouse’s log-in information, but you are not allowed to log in to his or her private accounts without permission.
  2. Hacking: Someone with technical savvy may be able to remotely access a person’s private digital information. Hackers can breach digital security by exploiting system weaknesses or sending an email with malicious software. Hacking into your spouse’s digital devices is a major violation of his or her privacy.
  3. Monitoring: One goal of gaining access to someone’s digital device is to install software that can track and record private conversations. If someone’s spouse was previously allowed to use a device, he or she could have installed spyware. Monitoring your spouse’s emails, texts, phone calls, and video chats is a definite violation of the eavesdropping law.

Public Information

Social media has become the big exception to the eavesdropping laws that restrict access to personal information. Your spouse cannot expect information to remain private if he or she posted it publicly on Facebook or another platform. It is legal for you to watch your spouse’s public social media activity to see if he or she says anything that may be relevant to your divorce.

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Rebuilding Your Self-Confidence During DivorceGetting a divorce can ultimately lead to a more fulfilling life, but the immediate effect can be a blow to your self-confidence. It is common to feel like you failed in your marriage and question whether you can create other meaningful relationships. While you may struggle to move beyond this self-doubt, there are ways that you can boost your confidence during and after your divorce:

  1. Remember Your Strengths: You are dwelling on the failures in your life, ignoring the many successes you have had, both professional and personal. Try writing out a list of your accomplishments to remind yourself that you are a strong and capable person. Successes could be getting a college degree, starting a job, or raising your children. Even the fact that you were married was an accomplishment because your positive qualities were enough for someone to want to marry you.
  2. Talk to Your Support System: Your depression during your divorce can skew your memories of your past accomplishments and your sense of self-worth. A family member or close friend can tell you about the things they love about you. A divorce coach or therapist can help you look at your life more objectively and realize that you are being too hard on yourself.
  3. Forgiving Yourself: You want to be able to blame someone for your divorce in order to understand why it happened. Though you may be angry at your spouse, you likely blame yourself for not being able to save your marriage. Part of you may also feel guilty because you believe you quit your marriage. Divorce is a common practice and does not make you a failure. You may have made mistakes, but you understand them and can avoid repeating them in future relationships.
  4. Planning Ahead: If you are not satisfied with your life, then your divorce is your chance to change it. Set career goals and figure out how you will reach them. Commit yourself to a healthier lifestyle with more exercise and a better diet. Become the best parent that you can at a time when your children need your support. There is life after your divorce, and you can plan for how you will be successful.

Contact a St. Charles Divorce Attorney

The process of rebuilding your confidence starts during your divorce. Working with a Kane County divorce attorney and divorce coach at Goostree Law Group will help you feel confident and have a clear understanding of what you need from your divorce. To schedule a free consultation, call 630-584-4800.

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Government Shutdowns Have Limited Effects on DivorcesAfter more than a month, the federal government shutdown has ended with a deal to reopen the government for three weeks. However, President Donald Trump mentioned the possibility of another shutdown if he could not reach an agreement with Democratic leaders. You may wonder whether a shutdown has any effect on divorces. In most situations, the answer is “no.” A shutdown impacts the funding for federal courts, but state courts handle divorce and family law cases. A shutdown would likely affect a divorce only when one of the spouses is a federal employee.

Immediate Consequences

Federal employees do not receive pay during a government shutdown. This should not create any uncertainty about a spouse’s income during divorce negotiations because most employees receive back pay after the shutdown has ended. The government may not repay federal contractors, but those losses should not change the spouse’s future income once the government is running again. The missed pay could immediately affect people who:

  • Are trying to obtain a loan to purchase their own home following a divorce;
  • Are required to make monthly child support or spousal maintenance payments as part of a completed divorce agreement; or
  • Do not have enough money to pay for their own child or personal expenses.

It is important to talk to your family law attorney and former spouse about your financial concerns during a government shutdown. Your former spouse may be understanding about a missed or reduced support payment when you are not receiving your income. If a shutdown persists, you can also file a motion to modify your support payments because of a change in income. However, you could be held in contempt of your divorce agreement if you fail to make support payments without explaining the reason to your former spouse or the court.

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Differences Between a Divorce Coach and a TherapistYou will need the assistance of several professionals when you are going through a divorce. Hiring a divorce attorney is a necessity because of the many legal complexities of the process. Some divorcees also find it helpful to see a mental health therapist to discuss their emotional issues related to the divorce. If you are working with both of these people, you may wonder why you would need to have a divorce coach. The answer is that a divorce coach provides a service that is unique from a therapist and can help you through the process.

Not a Therapist

The jobs of a divorce coach and a therapist do overlap in some basic areas. Both approach your divorce from a personal perspective, understanding that it is an emotional process. However, there are several differences in how a divorce coach can help you reach your goal:

  1. A Divorce Coach Focuses on Action: You see a therapist to better understand how your divorce is affecting your emotions and how to cope. A divorce coach addresses the issues that you are concerned about with your divorce and helps you create solutions. A divorce coach will make sure that you follow through on your plan, while a therapist takes a more gradual approach that encourages you to reach a conclusion at your own pace.
  2. A Divorce Coach Can Relate to Your Experience: Many divorce coaches chose their profession because they went through their own divorce. They know which parts of a divorce can be difficult and how divorcees need both support and encouragement. A divorce coach can be like a friend who has already experienced his or her own divorce, except a divorce coach is also professionally trained to advise you.
  3. A Divorce Coach Works Directly on Your Divorce: Therapy is about addressing you as a person, which may take a larger view than the immediate concerns of your divorce. A divorce coach is most concerned about how your divorce is immediately affecting you and is part of the divorce team that is guiding you through the process. Some divorce coaches work alongside divorce attorneys, with each focusing on the ways they can help you.

Contact a Kane County Divorce Attorney

No single professional can replicate all the ways that a divorce coach can help you. A St. Charles, Illinois, divorce attorney at Goostree Law Group can put you in contact with the firm's divorce coach to discuss the benefits of the service. Schedule a free consultation by calling 630-584-4800.

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Goostree Law Group

Goostree Law Group

 555 S. Randall Road, Suite 200
St. Charles, IL 60174

 630-584-4800

 1770 Park Street, Suite 205
Naperville IL 60563

 630-364-4046

 400 S. County Farm Road, Suite 300
Wheaton, IL 60187

 630-407-1777

Our Illinois divorce attorneys represent clients in Kane County, DuPage County, Kendall County and DeKalb County, including Geneva, Batavia, St.Charles, Wayne, Wasco, Elburn, Virgil, Lily Lake, Aurora, North Aurora, Elgin, South Elgin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Gilberts, Millcreek, Maple Park, Kaneville, LaFox, Yorkville, Oswego, Plano, Sugar Grove, Big Rock, Bristol, Newark, DeKalb, Sycamore, Naperville, Wheaton, West Chicago, Winfield, Warrenville, Downers Grove, Lombard, Oak Brook, Streamwood, Hoffman Estates, Barrington, South Barrington, Lake Barrington, Schaumburg, Big Grove, Boulder Hill, Bristol, Joliet, Kendall, Lisbon, Minooka, Montgomery, Plainfield, Sandwich, Yorkville and many other cities.

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