Initiating Conversations About Prenuptial AgreementsDespite the practicality of getting a prenuptial agreement, there is no avoiding that it is an awkward conversation to have with the person you plan to marry. Talking about a prenup means you are admitting the possibility that your marriage will end in divorce. It is particularly uncomfortable if you are the one who broaches the subject. Anger, distress and avoidance are all possible reactions. How you introduce the topic can determine whether you will be able to continue the conversation and create an agreement.

Framing the Conversation

Before you have your first prenup conversation, you should consider ways to present the subject that make it seem more benign. You can plan exactly what you will say to start the conversation, but everything beyond that should follow a broader outline. Sounding scripted can be off putting, and you must be flexible enough to respond to unexpected questions. You can expect that your significant other will ask why you want a prenuptial agreement. Prepare several answers that frame the idea as reasonable:

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Financing the Cost of Your DivorceDivorce is an expensive process. Beyond what you may give up in the divorce settlement, you are responsible for paying attorney and court fees. You may need an alternative form of financing if your available income cannot pay for your legal fees. Establishing credit or liquidating assets involves its own risks. You must carefully consider the consequences of each form of financing before making your decision.

Bank Loans and Credit Cards

If you have a good credit rating, you can pay your legal fees by taking out a loan or charging it to a credit card. Naturally, you will pay more over time because of interest. However, you must also consider what level of payments you will be able to afford after your divorce. You, and not your spouse, are responsible for the debt you create after you file for divorce.

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Divorce When a Spouse Has DementiaWhen a spouse enters the advanced stages of dementia, his or her marital relationship fundamentally changes. The healthy spouse becomes a caregiver or hires a healthcare professional to perform the duties. Either way, the spouses’ relationship as partners is over. Unfortunately, a marriage to a dementia patient can deteriorate to the point that the spouses divorce. How a court considers a divorce case involving someone with dementia depends on which party is initiating the divorce.

Divorcing a Dementia Patient

Spouses of dementia patients may have mixed feelings about whether they should stay in their marriages. Most people feel they should remain loyal to their spouses, regardless of the mental or physical deterioration they suffer. However, having a spouse with dementia may not feel like being married at all:

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Perils of Dating Too Soon After DivorceDating after divorce would be simpler if there was a set amount of time after which you knew you were ready to start a new relationship. Emotionally moving on from your marriage is a process, not a time period. Divorcees create arbitrary waiting periods because they know they should not immediately jump into a new relationship. However, you cannot predict how long your emotional recovery will take. Entering into a relationship too soon after a divorce can lead to impulsive decisions and unfortunate consequences.

Still Recovering

Divorcees may feel the desire to start dating again before they are emotionally ready for a new relationship. Dating fills a void left by the divorce and distracts you from addressing your underlying emotions. During a new relationship, you can tell that you have not moved past your divorce if:

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Keeping Your Phone Number and Other Protection Order RemediesWhen filing an order of protection in a domestic violence case, the petitioner may suddenly realize the various ways he or she is connected to the abuser. The victim must take steps to cut off access to properties and finances in order to shield him or herself from the abuser. However, both the accuser and accused may normally have an equal right to the shared properties. Illinois lawmakers included several remedies in the state's order of protection law that favor the petitioners’ rights to access and control various properties. A revision to the law went into effect at the start of the new year that extends those rights to cell phone accounts.

Phone Control

Under the revised law, a petitioner who has filed an order of protection may request that a wireless service provider move his or her phone number to a separate account. The law is meant as another way for domestic violence victims to be financially independent from their abusers. Domestic partners often share a wireless telephone service plan. If the abuser is the primary holder of the account, he or she has control over all phone numbers related to the account. With the new law, the petitioner

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Goostree Law Group

Goostree Law Group

 555 S. Randall Road, Suite 200
St. Charles, IL 60174

 630-584-4800

 400 S. County Farm Road, Suite 300
Wheaton, IL 60187

 630-407-1777

Our Illinois divorce attorneys represent clients in Kane County, DuPage County, Kendall County and DeKalb County, including Geneva, Batavia, St.Charles, Wayne, Wasco, Elburn, Virgil, Lily Lake, Aurora, North Aurora, Elgin, South Elgin, Bartlett, Crystal Lake, Gilberts, Millcreek, Maple Park, Kaneville, LaFox, Yorkville, Oswego, Plano, Sugar Grove, Big Rock, Bristol, Newark, DeKalb, Sycamore, Naperville, Wheaton, West Chicago, Winfield, Warrenville, Downers Grove, Lombard, Oak Brook, Streamwood, Hoffman Estates, Barrington, South Barrington, Lake Barrington, Schaumburg, Big Grove, Boulder Hill, Bristol, Joliet, Kendall, Lisbon, Minooka, Montgomery, Plainfield, Sandwich, Yorkville and many other cities.

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